Robinson Huron Treaty Agreement

Robinson Huron Treaty Agreement

The second Robinson contract for the Lake Huron region, commonly known as the Surrender of the Saugeen Peninsula or Saugeen Surrenders, was concluded on October 13, 1854 in suction cups between the Ojibwa Chiefs, who live on the Sauge Peninsula (Bruce) under the direction of Chief Waabadik, and the Crown, represented by a delegation led by Laurence Oliantph. It`s registered as crown contract number 72. Although not negotiated by William Benjamin Robinson, so no “Robinson Treaty,” it is generally included in them. For the survey of Sault Ste. The municipal land of Mary in 1846, the state surveyor Alexander Vidal was confronted with secondary aigoching and Shingwaukonse. Shingwaukonse asked Vidal to stop the survey until a contract was negotiated. Mining speculator and publisher George Desbarats, who worked at Amor on the north shore of Lake Huron, wrote in 1847 to the Superintendent of Indian Affairs requesting that the claims of Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe) be settled. Chiefs Shingwaukonse, Nebenaigoching and Menissinowenninne visited Governor General Lord Elgin in Montreal in 1849. His address to the Governor General was printed on July 7, 1849 in the Montreal Gazette.

It turned out that the Anishinaabeg had called for justice and a treaty, while questioning British claims to treat indigenous peoples with more dignity and justice than Americans. The Anishinaabeg also accused the British of stealing their country. The 30,000 people who live on the more than 40,000 square kilometres of the contract each receive $4 a year, a sum that has not increased since the 1870s. Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe) asks and the need for a contract began in the 1840s with the discovery of copper and iron deposits on the south shore of Lake Superior. Speculation about the potential of the North Shore has also reinforced the desire for a contract. A Crown and Customs officer, Joseph Wilson, became Sault Ste. Marie (now Ontario) appointed. Shortly after his arrival in 1843, Chief Shingwaukonse Wilson briefed on Anishinaabeg`s rights and rights. In 1845, the Province of Canada claimed authority over Lake Huron and the north shore of Lake Superior, before passing the first mining lease. Until 1846, despite the absence of a contract, 64 mineral licences were granted and surveying of the north coast began. The Robinson Treaty for the Upper Lake, commonly known as the Robinson Superior Treaty, was signed on September 7, 1850 in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, between Ojibwa Chiefs, who live on the Northern Shore of Lake Superior from the Pigeon River to Batchawana Bay, and The Crown, represented by a delegation led by William Benjamin Robinson.

It`s registered as crown contract number 60. The Robinson contract was one of two contracts signed in 1850 between Chiefs Ojibwa and The Crown. The first contract involved Ojibwa chiefs on the north shore of Superior Lake. The second contract, signed two days later, also included Ojibwa chiefs along the eastern and northern shores of Lake Huron. The Wiikwemkoong First Nation has not signed either treaty and its country is considered “unre-dismantled.” Prior to the 1850s, the majority of contracts in today`s Ontario focused exclusively on the Southern Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River. The need to develop contracts in the Upper Great Lakes has been fuelled by the need for new land for agricultural development and the growing interest of mining companies in exploring the lands of the Upper Great Lakes in search of potential mineral deposits.


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